Guelph Family Health Study’s Home-Based Obesity Prevention Intervention Increases Fibre and Fruit Intake in Preschool-Aged Children

Publication: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
1 February 2018

Abstract

Purpose: The Guelph Family Health Study (GFHS) pilot was designed to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a home-based obesity prevention intervention on health behaviours and obesity risk. The objective of this analysis was to determine the effect of the 6-month intervention on preschool-aged children’s dietary intakes.
Methods: Families with children aged 1.5–5 years old were randomized to receive one of the following: 4 home visits with a health educator as well as tailored emails and mailed incentives (4HV; n = 19 children); 2 home visits with a health educator as well as tailored emails and mailed incentives (2HV; n = 14 children); or general health advice through emails (control; n = 12 children). Three-day food records were completed by parents for their children before and after the 6-month intervention and analyzed for 3-day average intakes of energy, nutrients, and MyPlate food groups.
Results: After the 6-month intervention, the 4HV group had significantly higher fibre intake and the 4HV and 2HV groups had significantly higher fruit intake, both compared with the control group.
Conclusions: This study provides support for a home-based intervention approach to improve the diet quality of preschool-aged children.

Résumé

Objectif : Le projet pilote de la Guelph Family Health Study [Étude sur la santé familiale de Gelph] (GFHS) a été conçu pour examiner la faisabilité d’une intervention à domicile de prévention de l’obésité et son efficacité relativement aux comportements liés à la santé et aux risques d’obésité. L’objectif de cette analyse était de déterminer l’effet de cette intervention de 6 mois sur les apports alimentaires d’enfants d’âge préscolaire.
Méthodes : Des familles comprenant des enfants de 1,5 à 5 ans ont été réparties aléatoirement et recevaient l’une des options suivantes : 4 visites à domicile d’un éducateur en matière de santé ainsi que des courriels personnalisés et des mesures incitatives envoyées par la poste (4VD; n = 19 enfants); 2 visites à domicile d’un éducateur en matière de santé ainsi que des courriels personnalisés et des mesures incitatives envoyées par la poste (2VD; n = 14 enfants) ou des conseils généraux en matière de santé par courriel (témoin; n = 12 enfants). Les parents ont rempli des journaux alimentaires de 3 jours pour leurs enfants avant et après l’intervention de 6 mois, et ceux-ci ont été analysés afin de mesurer l’apport moyen en énergie, nutriments et groupes alimentaires « MyPlate » sur 3 jours.
Résultats : Après l’intervention de 6 mois, les membres du groupe 4VD avaient un apport en fibres significativement plus élevé et les membres des groupes 4VD et 2VD avaient un apport significativement plus élevé en fruits que les membres du groupe témoin.
Conclusions : Cette étude fournit des arguments en faveur d’une approche d’intervention à domicile visant à améliorer la qualité du régime alimentaire des enfants d’âge préscolaire.

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Financial support: Health for Life Initiative, University of Guelph.
Conflicts of interest: The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Information & Authors

Information

Published In

cover image Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research
Volume 79Number 2June 2018
Pages: 86 - 90

History

Published online: 1 February 2018

Authors

Affiliations

Julia A. Mirotta MSc
Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON
Gerarda A. Darlington PhD
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON
Andrea C. Buchholz PhD, RD
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON
Jess Haines PhD, RD
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON
David W.L. Ma PhD
Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON
Alison M. Duncan PhD, RD
Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON
Guelph Family Health Study

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